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  CANADIAN 5 CENTS

Calgary Coin offers an extensive selection of Canadian 5 cent coins including 5 cent silver and nickel coins for sale on the internet and in my store here in Calgary. I usually have most dates available in a variety of grades and prices for collectors at all levels, usually priced at a discount from the Canadian Coin News trend sheet price guide.

I normally do not provide images my coins as I have thousands of coins, sometimes multiples of the same coin. Imaging even a tiny percent of them would be impossible and putting that many images on my web pages would make them difficult to download, plus for inexpensive coins the value to the time to create the images would far exceed the value of the coins. I grade conservatively, describing any significant defects, including minor ones many dealers would not mention. If you ever receive a coin from me that you are not satisfied with, please feel free to return it for a full refund.

For those unfamiliar with the grade (quality) descriptions preceding each price, they are discussed on my Canadian Coin Introduction Page.

Prices are in Canadian Dollars

SHORTCUTS TO BACK SECTIONS

Victoria Silver, 1858-1901
Edward VII Silver, 1902-1910
George V Silver, 1911-1921
George V Nickel, 1922-1936
George VI, 1937-1952
Elizabeth, 1953-1989
Elizabeth, 1990-2012

SILVER FIVE CENTS

Because of their very small size and silver color, silver five cent coins were commonly referred to as "FISH SCALES".

QUEEN VICTORIA
1837 TO 1901

PROVINCE OF CANADA

In 1858, 5 cent coins were struck with the Victorian young head design. While of identical design to those first issued by the Dominion of Canada in 1870, 1858 examples were issued for the British territory then known as the Province of Canada. The design was by Leonard C. Wyon. These were struck of 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper, at 1.16 grams with a diameter of 15.5 mm. The die axis was coinage alignment of 180 degrees.


1858 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1858 5 CENT

1858 5 cents are found with large and small dates, with the large date the rarer variety. The difference between is minor and difficult for many to differentiate but on the small dates the top and bottom circles of the final 8 as close to round while on the large date are more elliptical. On the small date the size of all four digits in the date are about the same, while on the large date the 58 are slightly larger than the 18. This is easier to tell when you have the two side by side.

  1. 1858 small date ........ holed and plugged G-4   $ 4.00
     
  2. 1858 large date .................... ICCS F-15     SOLD

No Canada 5 cents were struck from 1859 to 1869.


DOMINION OF CANADA


1870 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

Unlike the other denominations except for the 10 cent, the Wyon young head design continued in use after Confederation right up to 1901. The standards remain as the 1858 issue at 1.16 grams, 15.5 mm and coinage axis. Coins without mint mark were struck at the British Royal mint in London England while those with the H mint mark were struck at the Heaton mint in Birmingham England.

1870 5 CENT

1870 5 cents come with two border types. Flat border (FB) which is sometimes called wide border. Raised border (RB) which is sometimes called the narrow border. There is no significant difference in rarity or value between the two but as the difference is distinctive, many collectors collect both. All dates after 1870 have the raised (narrow) border.

  1. 1870 flat border ................ bent G-6/G-4   $ 5.00
  2. 1870 flat border ........................ VG-8   $22.50
  3. 1870 flat border .................. ICCS AU-50  $175.00
     
  4. 1870 raised border ........... rim nicks VF-30   $32.50

1871 5 CENT

  1. 1871 ................................... VF-20     SOLD

1872 H 5 CENT

  1. 1872 H ................................. VG-10   $22.00

No Canada 5 cents were struck in 1873.

In 1874, there are two varieties of 5 cent coins. The first is known as the "crosslet 4" which has a small vertical bar at the very back of the four, and a slightly larger date (some references call this the "large date" variety). The second variety is the "plain 4" which lacks that small upright at the back of the four, and has a slightly smaller date (and some references call the small date variety). The plain 4 is very slightly scarcer than the crosslet 4, but the difference is minor and there is no significant difference in the values.

1874 H 5 CENT

  1. 1874 H plain 4 ............ slightly bent aG-3   $ 5.00
  2. 1874 H plain 4 ............. slightly bent G-4   $ 9.75
     
  3. 1874 H crosslet 4 ................... G-4/aG-3   $ 8.75
  4. 1874 H crosslet 4 ................. ICCS XF-40  $220.00

1875 H 5 CENT

  1. 1875 H small date, 3 m hole, clear date .. G-4   $20.00
  2. 1875 H small date ...................... VF-20  $520.00
  3. 1875 H small date ................ toned XF-40  $875.00
     
  4. 1875 H large date .................. ICCS F-12     SOLD

No Canada 5 cents were struck from 1876 to 1879.

1880 5 CENT

  1. 1880 H obv. 2 ...................... rough G-6     SOLD
     
  2. 1880 H obv. 3 ................... cleaned aG-3   $ 3.50
  3. 1880 H obv. 3 ..................... toned aG-3   $ 4.50
  4. 1880 H obv. 3 ..................... mark VG-10   $ 8.00
  5. 1880 H obv. 3 ........................... F-15   $21.00
  6. 1880 H obv. 3 ..................... ICCS XF-45  $132.50

1881 H 5 CENT

  1. 1881 H .................... light scratch VG-8   $ 8.00
  2. 1881 H ................................. VG-10   $14.00
  3. 1881 H ......................... scratch VF-30   $40.00

1882 H 5 CENT

  1. 1882 H .. scratches, sl bent, spotty tone VG-8   $ 2.50

1883 H 5 CENT

  1. 1883 H obverse 4 ......... cleaned, dings F-12     SOLD
     
  2. 1883 H obverse 5 ....................... VG-10     SOLD

1884 5 CENT

1874 5 cents are found in what are known as near and far 4 varieties which can be difficult to tell a part as the spacing difference is very minor. A second diagnostic is the shape of the four where the near 4 has a slightly squared off front tip and a slightly wedge shaped upright at the back of the 4, which the far 4 is more pointed at the front and the upright at the back of the 4 is closer to rectangular than wedge shaped. On both types the first 8 is weak, especially at the top.

  1. 1884 near 4 ........ hole, mount fragment F-12   $12.00
     
  2. 1884 far 4 ........................ dinged G-6     SOLD

In 1885 and 1886, there are varieties with large and small last digits in the date, plus in 1885 there is a scarcer variety with the small 5 punched over a large 5.

1885 CENT

The way to tell the 1885 large and small 5 a part is to look inside the circle of the 5. The opening inside the large 5 is distinctly comma shaped, while on the small 5 it is rounded. large 5/5 and small 5/5 varieties exist with some grading companies mistakenly listing the small 5/5 as a small 5 / large 5.

  1. 1885 large 5 ........................... VF-30  $115.00
     
  2. 1885 small 5 ........................ bent G-4   $ 3.50
  3. 1885 small 5, incorrectly identified by PCGS
    as Large 5/5 . the cleaning is very light ....
    ... PCGS 34602474 Genuine, cleaned, AU-details  $240.00
     
  4. 1885 small 5/5 .................... ICCS VG-10  $130.00
  5. 1885 small 5/5 ................... toned VF-20  $325.00
  6. 1885 small 5/5 ........ CCCS hard holder VF-30  $525.00

1886 5 CENT

  1. 1886 small 6 ............... slightly bent G-4   $ 4.00
  2. 1886 small 6 ....................... marks G-6   $ 5.00
  3. 1886 small 6 ............................ VG-8   $12.75
  4. 1886 small 6 .................... scratch F-12   $13.00
  5. 1886 small 6 ............ slightly rough VF-20   $16.00
  6. 1886 small 6 ..................... toned VF-30   $71.50
     
  7. 1886 large 6 ....................... spots G-6   $12.00
  8. 1886 large 6 ..................... toned VG-10   $20.00
  9. 1886 large 6 ........................... VF-20   $48.00

1887 5 CENT

  1. 1887 .................................... VG-8     SOLD

1888 5 CENT

  1. 1888 ........................... scratches G-6   $ 5.00
  2. 1888 .............................. rough VG-8   $ 2.50
  3. 1888 .............................. dings VG-8   $ 4.00
  4. 1888 ......................... toned VG-10/G-4   $ 7.25
  5. 1888 ........................ light marks F-12   $12.00
  6. 1888 .................................... F-15   $20.00
  7. 1888 .............................. ICCS VF-30   $45.00
  8. 1888 ............................. toned XF-40   $64.00

1889 5 CENT

There is an interesting variety of the 1889 5 cent where the first 8 is over a 3, which is not in the standard listings but is in the Charlton specialty edition on 5 cents.

  1. 1889 .............................. ICCS VF-30  $172.50

1890 H 5 CENT

  1. 1890 H ...................... ding on date G-6   $ 4.00
  2. 1890 H .................................. VG-8   $10.50
  3. 1890 H ........................... marks VF-20   $12.00
  4. 1890 H ......................... cleaned VF-20   $24.00
  5. 1890 H ................................. VF-20   $32.00
  6. 1890 H ............................ ICCS VF-20   $32.00
  7. 1890 H ............................ ICCS VF-30   $56.00
  8. 1890 H ............................ ICCS XF-45  $110.00

1891 5 CENT

The easiest way to tell obverse 2 from 5 is by Victoria's lips where on obverse 2 the top lip protrudes distinctly beyond the lower, while for obverse 5 the lower lip protrudes very slightly beyond the upper (nearly even). This difference is visible on even heavily worn examples.

  1. 1891 obverse 2 .......................... aG-3   $ 3.50
  2. 1891 obverse 2 ........................... G-4   $ 5.00
  3. 1891 obverse 2 ..................... TONED G-4   $ 5.00
  4. 1891 obverse 2 ........................... G-6   $ 6.50
  5. 1891 obverse 2 .......... cleaned,scratch F-12   $ 5.00
  6. 1891 obverse 2 .......................... F-12   $11.75
  7. 1891 obverse 2 ................ scratches F-15   $ 5.50
     
  8. 1891 obverse 5 ..................... bent VG-8   $ 8.00
  9. 1891 obverse 5 .......................... VG-8   $ 8.00
  10. 1891 obverse 5 ........... light scratch VG-10   $ 8.00
  11. 1891 obverse 5 ......... bent, edge nicks F-12   $ 4.00
  12. 1891 obverse 5 ........... slightly rough F-12   $ 5.00
  13. 1891 obverse 5 .................. cleaned F-12   $ 6.50
  14. 1891 obverse 5 ................. cleaned VF-30   $12.00

1892 5 CENT

Some older references list 1892 with both obverse 2 and 5 but more recent research suggests only obverse 2 exists with any offered as obverse 5 are probably miss-identified.

  1. 1892 .................................... F-15   $24.00
  2. 1892 ............... cleaned, minor mark VF-20   $16.00
  3. 1892 .............................. ICCS VF-30   $56.00

1893 5 CENT

  1. 1893 ..................................... G-4   $ 5.00
  2. 1893 ................. cleaned, scratches VG-8   $ 5.00
  3. 1893 .................................... VG-8   $ 8.00
  4. 1893 .................... light scratches F-12   $ 8.00
  5. 1893 ............ trace rough, dark areas F-15   $ 5.00
  6. 1893 .......................... scratched F-15   $10.00
  7. 1893 ......................... light tone F-15   $15.00
  8. 1893 ............ cleaned, slightly bent VF-20   $ 6.50
  9. 1893 ....................... light marks VF-30   $24.00
  10. 1893 ................................... VF-30   $30.00
  11. 1893 ..................... PCGS 22086025 AU-58  $240.00

1894 5 CENT

  1. 1894 .......................... scratched F-12     SOLD

No Canada 5 cents were struck in 1895 but were struck every year after that.

1896 5 CENT

  1. 1896 ............................... rough G-4   $ 3.50
  2. 1896 ..................................... G-4   $ 5.00
  3. 1896 .................. cleaned scratches VG-8   $ 4.00
  4. 1896 ............................ scratch VG-8   $ 5.00
  5. 1896 .................................... VG-8   $ 8.00
  6. 1896 ............................... VG-10/G-6   $ 6.50
  7. 1896 ................ cleaned light marks F-12   $ 6.50
  8. 1896 .................. cleaned and toned F-12   $ 8.00
  9. 1896 ................... many light marks F-15   $ 8.00
  10. 1896 ................ large deep scratch VF-20   $ 5.00
  11. 1896 ......................... scratches VF-20   $ 9.00
  12. 1896 .............................. ICCS VF-30   $28.00
  13. 1896 .......... PQ ................ ICCS XF-40   $45.00

1897 5 CENT

Four varieties exist for 1997:

1) narrow 8 - most common.
2) Wide 8.
3) narrow 8 over wide 8.
4) 7 over 7 with a standard narrow 8 - scarcest type.

I have noticed recently that ICCS sometimes refers to the narrow 8 as the slender 8.

  1. 1897 narrow 8 ............................ G-4   $ 5.00
  2. 1897 narrow 8 ..................... toned F-12   $11.50
  3. 1897 narrow 8 .................... toned VF-20   $16.00
  4. 1897 narrow 8 .......................... VF-30   $28.00
     
  5. 1897 wide 8 ............................ XF-40   $48.00
     
  6. 1897 slender 8/wide 8 ..... ICCS cleaned XF-40     SOLD

1898 5 CENT

  1. 1898 ..................................... G-4   $10.50
  2. 1898 ..................... slightly bent VF-20   $24.00
  3. 1898 ........................... scratch VF-20   $32.00
  4. 1898 ................................... VF-20   $52.50
  5. 1898 ......................... mid toned VF-30   $85.00
  6. 1898 ........................ dark toned VF-30   $85.00

1899 5 CENT

I have noted a variety in 1899 with a small 2nd 9, which I have not seen listed in any standard references.

  1. 1899 ....................... slightly bent G-4   $ 3.00
  2. 1899 ................................ mark G-4   $ 4.00
  3. 1899 ..................................... G-6   $ 5.50
  4. 1899 ................................... VG-10   $ 8.50
  5. 1899 .................................... F-12   $10.00
  6. 1899 ........... scratches, slightly bent F-15   $ 5.00
  7. 1899 .................................... F-15   $12.75
  8. 1899 ......................... light tone F-15   $12.75
  9. 1899 ................ scratches on cheek VF-20   $ 8.00
  10. 1899 ..................... toned scratch VF-20   $10.00
  11. 1899 ................................... VF-30   $24.00
  12. 1899 .............................. ICCS XF-45   $52.50
  13. 1899 ..................... faint scratch AU-50   $60.00
  14. 1899 ................... light tone ICCS AU-50   $72.50
  15. 1899 ................... light tone ICCS AU-55  $117.50
  16. 1899 .............................. ICCS AU-64  $560.00

1900 5 CENT

The 1900 5 cent exists with either large (round) and small (oval) 0's in the date, with the large 0's the rarer of the two. The easiest way to confirm the variety when looking at only one coin is by the hole in the middle of the O's which on the small (Oval) 0 is more distinctly over than the outside of the O, which in the wide (round) 0 the inside is a near perfect circle.

  1. 1900 oval 0's .... cleaned, slightly bent F-12   $ 5.00
  2. 1900 oval 0's ................... cleaned F-15   $ 5.50
  3. 1900 oval 0's .......... faint scratches VF-30   $16.00
  4. 1900 oval 0's .......................... VF-30   $23.00
  5. 1900 oval 0's ..................... ICCS MS-64  $600.00
     
  6. 1900 round 0's ........................... G-4     SOLD

1901 5 CENT

  1. 1901 ............................... toned G-4   $ 5.00
  2. 1901 ..................................... G-6   $ 5.50
  3. 1901 .................................... VG-8   $ 7.25
  4. 1901 ............................ scratch F-12   $ 6.50
  5. 1901 ............................... mark F-12   $ 8.50
  6. 1901 .............................. toned F-15   $11.50
  7. 1901 ......................... scratches VF-30   $12.00
  8. 1901 ................................... VF-30   $23.00
  9. 1901 .............................. ICCS AU-50   $72.00
  10. 1901 ............... ICCS AU-55, I grade AU-50   $72.00
  11. 1901 ................................... AU-50   $72.00
  12. 1901 ...... attractive mid tone ... ICCS MS-66 $2300.00


EDWARD VII
1902 TO 1910

The Edward VII five cent design is by George W. DeSaulles, with the portrait of Edward VII on the obverse. The reverse is similar to the Victorian type except that the word "CANADA" was moved from below the monarch head on the obverse to just above the date on the reverse.

The standards remain the same as the Victorian coins: with a weight of 1.16 grams; a diameter of 15.5 mm, and struck from 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper. From 1902 to 1907 they this have a "coinage" 180 degree die axis, and are without a mint mark if struck at the British Royal mint in London England, or have an "H" mint mark for those struck at the Heaton mint in Birmingham England. Starting in 1908, all of the coins were struck without a mint marks but this now designates the new Royal Canadian mint in Ottawa. Also in 1908, the die axis changed to "medal axis" or 0 degrees (normally used for war medals).

Edward VII coins are very difficult to grade because they are often weakly struck, and different dates wear slightly differently. Like most Canadian coins most of the grade is assigned from the portrait side and those details predominate in the grade, but on these one must look at details on the leaves on the reverse to sometimes differentiate between a worn obverse and a weak struck obverse. However, a coin that has XF wear but a VF portrait due to weak strike, should only be graded and priced as a VF-30 and not XF-40.

1903 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1902 5 CENT

Many but not all 1902 5 cents were struck with a concave reverse die, so that the portrait bows out very slightly. These coins tend to wear more quickly on the King's ear and one can find examples with the top of the ear worn through, but with VF-20 details in all other respects, however as will not grade one of these VF-20 without seeing a full ear, I prefer to grade those examples as F-15. For those who are type only collectors, 1902 is the least expensive date of George V 5 cent to find in high quality.

  1. 1902 .............................. rubbed G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1902 .......................... scratches VG-8   $ 2.00
  3. 1902 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  4. 1902 ................................... VG-10   $ 4.00
  5. 1902 .................... light scratches F-12   $ 3.00
  6. 1902 ............................ cleaned F-12   $ 3.50
  7. 1902 .............................. toned F-12   $ 4.50
  8. 1902 ........................ light marks F-15   $ 4.50
  9. 1902 .................. scratch, cleaned VF-20   $ 3.00
  10. 1902 ............................. marks VF-20   $ 4.50
  11. 1902 ......................... dark spot VF-20   $ 5.00
  12. 1902 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  13. 1902 ........................... scratch XF-40   $ 5.00
  14. 1902 .......................... polished XF-45   $ 6.50
  15. 1902 ........................... cleaned AU-50   $ 8.00
  16. 1902 ................................... AU-55   $29.50
  17. 1902 ................................... MS-63   $60.00
  18. 1902 . dark peripheral rainbow tone ICCS MS-64   $80.00
  19. 1902 ..................... PCGS 22122821 MS-64   $80.00

1902 H 5 CENT

For 1902 there is a scarcer small H without serifs, a more common large H with clear serifs top and bottom, and a much scarcer (probably just one die) large H over small H where the top of the small H sticks out of the top of the large H.

  1. 1902 small H ........................ bent G-4   $ 2.50
  2. 1902 small H ............................. G-4   $ 6.50
  3. 1902 small H ........................... VF-20   $28.00
  4. 1902 small H worn obverse die, looks VF, XF-45   $40.00
  5. 1902 large H ............................. G-4   $ 2.50
  6. 1902 large H ............................. G-6   $ 3.00
  7. 1902 large H .................... cleaned VG-8   $ 2.50
  8. 1902 large H .................. dark spot VG-8   $ 3.50
  9. 1902 large H ............................ F-12   $ 5.00
  10. 1902 large H/small H .................... VG-8     SOLD

Prior to 1903 Edwardian 5 cent coins had a St. Edward's crown at the top of the reverse, with 21 leaves in the wreath. That design is retained for the Heaton (H) mint coins right up to 1907 but starting in 1903 coins struck at the Royal Mint in London (which do not have the H) have W. H. J. Blakemore's design slightly modified with the Imperial state crown and 22 leaves in the wreath.

1903 5 CENT

  1. 1903 ................................ bent G-4   $ 2.50
  2. 1903 ........................... scratches G-4   $ 3.00
  3. 1903 ..................................... G-4   $ 5.00
  4. 1903 .......................... scratches VG-8   $ 4.00
  5. 1903 .................................... VG-8   $ 6.50
  6. 1903 .................................... F-12   $10.50
  7. 1903 ........................... cleaned VF-20   $ 8.00
  8. 1903 .............................. ICCS AU-55  $190.00

1903 H 5 CENT

For 1903 there are small and large H examples with the large H scarcer. There are also some with the small H slightly re-cut to look sightly doubled.

  1. 1903 small H ......................... G-6/G-4   $ 3.00
  2. 1903 small H ............................. G-6   $ 3.25
  3. 1903 small H ............................ VG-8   $ 4.00
  4. 1903 small H, small edge nick, scratches VG-10   $ 2.50
  5. 1903 small H .................... cleaned F-12   $ 3.50
  6. 1903 small H .................... scratch F-12   $ 3.50
  7. 1903 small H ........ cleaned, scratches VF-20   $ 4.00
  8. 1903 small H ........................... VF-20   $ 8.00
  9. 1903 large H ............................ F-15   $26.00
  10. 1903 large H ........................... VF-30   $48.00
  11. 1903 large H ...................... ICCS AU-50  $110.00
  12. 1903 large H ...................... ICCS AU-55  $170.00
     
  13. 1903 small H re cut H ............. ICCS AU-55     SOLD

1904 5 CENT

  1. 1904 ................................ mark G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1904 ..................................... G-6   $ 3.00
  3. 1904 .................... harshly cleaned VG-8   $ 2.00
  4. 1904 ............................ cleaned VG-8   $ 2.50
  5. 1904 ....................... marks, toned F-12   $ 5.00
  6. 1904 .......................... scratches F-15   $ 3.00
  7. 1904 ......................... scratches VF-20   $10.00
  8. 1904 ................................... VF-20   $10.00
  9. 1904 ....................... light marks XF-40   $20.00
  10. 1904 ................................... XF-40   $28.00
  11. 1904 .............................. ICCS XF-45   $52.50
  12. 1904 .............................. ICCS AU-50   $80.00

1905 5 CENT

  1. 1905 ............................... toned G-4   $ 2.50
  2. 1905 ...................... slightly rough G-6   $ 2.00
  3. 1905 ............................... toned G-6   $ 3.25
  4. 1905 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 4.00
  5. 1905 .................................... VG-8   $ 4.00
  6. 1905 ........... cleaned, light scratches F-12   $ 3.00
  7. 1905 .......................... scratches F-12   $ 4.00
  8. 1905 .................... slightly rough VF-20   $ 5.00
  9. 1905 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 5.00
  10. 1905 ......................... scratches XF-40   $12.00
  11. 1905 ............................. toned XF-40   $20.00

1906 5 CENT

  1. 1906 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.75
  2. 1906 ........................ trace rough VG-8   $ 2.50
  3. 1906 ........................ large marks F-15   $ 2.00
  4. 1906 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 5.00
  5. 1906 ...... very light scratches ....... AU-50   $32.00

1907 5 CENT

  1. 1907 ............................... spots G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1907 ..................................... G-6   $ 3.00
  3. 1907 ............................... ding VG-8   $ 2.50
  4. 1907 ............................ cleaned VG-8   $ 2.50
  5. 1907 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  6. 1907 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 3.50
  7. 1907 ............................. toned VG-10   $ 4.00
  8. 1907 ....................... spotty toned F-12   $ 4.00
  9. 1907 .................................... F-12   $ 4.50
  10. 1907 ........................ trace rough F-15   $ 2.50
  11. 1907 ............................ scratch F-15   $ 3.50
  12. 1907 ...................... light scratch F-15   $ 4.50
  13. 1907 .................... slightly rough VF-20   $ 4.00
  14. 1907 ................ reverse die breaks VF-30   $ 8.00
  15. 1907 ................................... XF-40   $11.50
  16. 1907 ................................... AU-50   $28.00

The Royal Canadian Mint opened in Ottawa in 1908 at which point nearly all Canadian coins were minted in Canada. The designs remained the same but the die axis changes from coinage to medal on all denominations except for the 1 cent which were always medal axis. Coinage axis means if you place your fingers above and below the portrait and spin the coin side to side the reverse comes out upside down. Medal axis means it stays right side up.

1908 5 CENT

1908 5 cent coins come with either a small or large 8, also called small and large date although only the 8 is different. It can be difficult to differentiate these looking at the 8 but the small cross above the reverse crown (above 5 cents) is a sharper cross on small date examples and a badly engraved Maltese cross (looks more like a bow tie) on the scarcer large date.

  1. 1908 small date ............ medium tone XF-40   $52.50
  2. 1908 small date ................... ICCS XF-40   $52.50
  3. 1908 small date ........................ XF-45   $65.00
     
  4. 1908 large date ................... ICCS VF-30  $170.00
  5. 1908 large date ........................ XF-40  $225.00
  6. 1908 large date .... dark tone ......... XF-40  $225.00
     

In 1909 and 1910 two different leaf shapes occur on the reverse wreath, with some having slightly rounded tips similar to maple leaves and others have more pointed tips similar to holly leaves. They can be slightly difficult to tell a part. Some references refer to them as pointed leaf (PL) and round leaf (RL) and other maple leaf (ML) and holly leaf (HL).

1909 5 CENT

The 1909 point leaves type has the cross over bow tie small crown at the top of the reverse. The round leaves type normally has only a bow tie but there is a fairly rare variety with a cross over bow tie.

  1. 1909 pointed leaves .................... XF-40  $100.00
  2. 1909 pointed leaves ............... ICCS XF-40  $100.00
     
  3. 1909 rounded leaves bow tie ............ VF-20   $12.00
  4. 1909 rounded leaves bow tie ............ VF-30   $23.00

1910 5 CENT

In 1910 all pointed leaves examples have a cross over bow tie on the small crown at the top of the reverse. Round leaves examples are found only with the bow tie.

  1. 1910 pointed leaves ...................... G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1910 pointed leaves ............. cleaned VG-8   $ 2.50
  3. 1910 pointed leaves ........... small dig VG-8   $ 3.00
  4. 1910 pointed leaves ..................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  5. 1910 pointed leaves ............... marks F-12   $ 3.00
  6. 1910 pointed leaves ..................... F-12   $ 4.00
  7. 1910 pointed leaves ............... toned F-15   $ 5.00
  8. 1910 pointed leaves ..................... F-15   $ 5.00
  9. 1910 pointed leaves ............ cleaned VF-20   $ 3.00
  10. 1910 pointed leaves .................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  11. 1910 pointed leaves ........ light marks VF-30   $ 5.50
  12. 1910 pointed leaves .................... VF-30   $ 8.00
  13. 1910 pointed leaves . cleaned, edge nick XF-40   $ 4.00
  14. 1910 pointed leaves . cleaning scratches XF-40   $ 6.50
  15. 1910 pointed leaves .............. toned XF-40   $11.50
  16. 1910 pointed leaves .................... MS-62   $80.00
     
  17. 1910 rounded leaves ...................... G-4   $ 7.25


GEORGE V
1911 to 1936

The 1903 reverse design by W. H. J. Blakemore was retained, along with the standards of a 1.16 grams, 15.5 mm, and an alloy of from 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper until 1919 when the alloy was reduced to 80% silver and 20% copper.


1911 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1911 5 CENT

George V coins were introduced in 1911 with "DEI GRATIA", Latin for "God' Grace", omitted from the obverse inscription. Known as the "GODLESS COINS" there was a public out rage and in 1912 "DEI GRATIA" returned to Canadian coins.

  1. 1911 Godless ............................. G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1911 Godless ............................ VG-8   $ 3.50
  3. 1911 Godless ...................... toned VG-8   $ 3.50
  4. 1911 Godless .................... cleaned F-12   $ 3.00
  5. 1911 Godless ........................... VF-20   $ 6.50
  6. 1911 Godless ........................... VF-30   $10.00
1912 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1912 5 CENT

  1. 1912 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.75
  2. 1912 ....................... weak reverse VG-8   $ 3.00
  3. 1912 .......................... dig on 9, VG-8   $ 3.00
  4. 1912 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  5. 1912 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 3.50
  6. 1912 ..................... light scratch VG-10   $ 3.00
  7. 1912 ....................... spotty tone VG-10   $ 3.50
  8. 1912 ................................... VG-10   $ 4.00
  9. 1912 ............................ cleaned F-12   $ 3.00
  10. 1912 ................. toned, light marks F-12   $ 3.00
  11. 1912 .................................... F-12   $ 4.50
  12. 1912 .................................... F-15   $ 5.00
  13. 1912 .............................. toned F-15   $ 5.00
  14. 1912 ...................... long scratch VF-20   $ 3.00
  15. 1912 ..................... small scratch VF-20   $ 5.00
  16. 1912 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.50
  17. 1912 ............................. toned VF-20   $ 5.50
  18. 1912 ................................... XF-45   $20.00

1913 5 CENT

  1. 1913 ..................................... G-6   $ 3.00
  2. 1913 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  3. 1913 ............................... VG-10/G-4   $ 3.50
  4. 1913 ................................ F-12/G-4   $ 3.50
  5. 1913 ....................... light scrape F-12   $ 3.00
  6. 1913 ...................... light scratch F-12   $ 3.00
  7. 1913 ............................ cleaned F-12   $ 3.50
  8. 1913 .................................... F-12   $ 4.50
  9. 1913 .............................. toned F-12   $ 4.50
  10. 1913 .................................... F-15   $ 5.00
  11. 1913 ........................... cleaned VF-20   $ 4.50
  12. 1913 ..................... light scratch VF-20   $ 4.00
  13. 1913 ............................. marks VF-20   $ 5.00
  14. 1913 ................................... VF-30   $ 7.25
  15. 1913 ......................... dark tone VF-30   $ 7.25
  16. 1913 ..................... light scratch XF-40   $ 6.50
  17. 1913 ............................ scuffs XF-40   $ 8.00

1914 5 CENT

  1. 1914 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.75
  2. 1914 ............................ scratch VG-8   $ 3.00
  3. 1914 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  4. 1914 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 3.50
  5. 1914 ................................... VG-10   $ 4.00
  6. 1914 ........................ trace rough F-12   $ 3.00
  7. 1914 ............................ scratch F-12   $ 3.00
  8. 1914 .................................... F-12   $ 4.50
  9. 1914 ................... scratches, toned F-15   $ 3.50
  10. 1914 ........................... cleaned VF-20   $ 5.00
  11. 1914 .............. dark tone, sl spotty VF-30   $ 8.00
  12. 1914 ................................... VF-30   $ 8.00
  13. 1914 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 8.00
  14. 1914 .......................... rim bump XF-40   $ 8.00

1915 5 CENT

At about 1.17 million, the 195 5 cent silver is the lowest mintage in the George V series.

  1. 1915 ............................. toned VF-20   $32.00
  2. 1915 ......................... mark on N VF-30   $32.00

1916 5 CENT

  1. 1916 .................................... VG-8   $ 5.00
  2. 1916 ........................ spots ICCS AU-55   $77.50

1917 5 CENT

  1. 1917 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1917 ................................ VG-8/G-4   $ 2.50
  3. 1917 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  4. 1917 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.75
  5. 1917 .................................... F-15   $ 4.50
  6. 1917 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  7. 1917 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 7.00
  8. 1917 .......................... corroded XF-40   $ 2.50
  9. 1917 ........................ light tone AU-55   $34.00

1918 5 CENT

  1. 1918 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1918 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.50
  3. 1918 ....................... toning line VG-10   $ 3.75
  4. 1918 ............................. toned VG-10   $ 3.75
  5. 1918 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.75
  6. 1918 ............................... mark F-12   $ 3.00
  7. 1918 ............................ cleaned F-12   $ 3.00
  8. 1918 .................................... F-12   $ 4.00
  9. 1918 ........................ light toned F-12   $ 4.00
  10. 1918 .............................. toned F-15   $ 4.50
  11. 1918 .................................... F-15   $ 4.50
  12. 1918 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  13. 1918 ........................... scratch VF-30   $ 4.00
  14. 1918 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 6.00
  15. 1918 ................................... VF-30   $ 6.00
  16. 1918 ............................. toned XF-40   $ 8.00
  17. 1918 ................................... XF-40   $ 8.00

1919 5 CENT

  1. 1919 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.75
  2. 1919 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.00
  3. 1919 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 3.00
  4. 1919 ........................ dark spots VG-10   $ 3.00
  5. 1919 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.50
  6. 1919 ......................... nice tone VG-10   $ 3.50
  7. 1919 ................... attractive tone VG-10   $ 3.50
  8. 1919 ............................ cleaned F-12   $ 2.50
  9. 1919 ............... nice tone but scuffs F-12   $ 3.00
  10. 1919 ......................... dark toned F-12   $ 4.00
  11. 1919 .................................... F-12   $ 4.00
  12. 1919 .............................. toned F-15   $ 4.50
  13. 1919 .................................... F-15   $ 4.50
  14. 1919 ....................... light marks VF-20   $ 4.00
  15. 1919 ....................... light toned VF-20   $ 5.00
  16. 1919 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  17. 1919 ................................... VF-30   $ 6.00
  18. 1919 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 6.00
  19. 1919 ........................... cleaned XF-45   $ 8.00

1920 and 1921 5 cent silver coins remain the same design, weight and diameter as the previous dates but the alloy was reduced to 80% silver and 20% copper.

1920 5 CENT

  1. 1920 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.50
  2. 1920 ................................ VG-8/G-6   $ 2.25
  3. 1920 ........................... rim nick VG-8   $ 2.50
  4. 1920 .................................... VG-8   $ 3.00
  5. 1920 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.50
  6. 1920 .............................. spots F-12   $ 3.75
  7. 1920 .................................... F-12   $ 4.00
  8. 1920 .......................... hairlined F-15   $ 3.00
  9. 1920 ............................ scratch F-15   $ 3.00
  10. 1920 .................... small scratches F-15   $ 4.00
  11. 1920 .............................. toned F-15   $ 4.50
  12. 1920 .................................... F-15   $ 4.50
  13. 1920 .............................. VF-20/VG-8   $ 4.00
  14. 1920 ........................... cleaned VF-20   $ 3.00
  15. 1920 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 3.00
  16. 1920 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  17. 1920 ............................. toned VF-20   $ 5.00
  18. 1920 ........................... cleaned VF-30   $ 4.00
  19. 1920 ..................... light scratch VF-30   $ 5.00
  20. 1920 ................................... VF-30   $ 6.00
  21. 1920 ......................... nice tone VF-30   $ 6.00
  22. 1920 ........................... cleaned XF-40   $ 5.00
  23. 1920 .................... slightly rough XF-40   $ 7.25
  24. 1920 ........................... cleaned XF-45   $ 7.25
  25. 1920 ................................... XF-45   $ 5.00
  26. 1920 .............................. ICCS MS-62   $48.00
  27. 1920 .............................. ICCS MS-63   $68.00
  28. 1920 ..................... PCGS 34580568 MS-65  $240.00

1921 5 CENT

More then 2.5 million 1921 5 cents were struck but on deciding 5 cents would be struck in nickel starting in 1922, most of the 1921 examples were melted. Estimates of how many survive vary from just over 300 to about 800 but I believe it is higher. Just over 300 having been certified although some examples may have been sent in more than once, most of the examples I come across have not yet been certified. Due to the numbers I see raw, and the fact it is not unusual to see several of them available at major coin shows, I believe there are at least 800 to 1000 and probably a little more than that. This still makes them one of the scarcest coins in the Canadian series.

Most examples will be weakly struck on one side suggesting the weakness is due to a worn die, otherwise it would be on both sides. Before assigning a grade one must example both sides carefully, especially the veins on the leaves on the reverse to determine if it is die wear or coin wear, making these difficult to grade accurately. Examples struck from strong dies on both sides, where the sides are even, bring a premium above the trend sheet estimates which assume some weakness on one side. I am always looking to purchase 1921 5 cents in any grade.

  1. 1921 ...................... PCGS 37074141 F-15     SOLD

1998 5 CENT SILVER

To commemorate the Royal Canadian Mint's 90th anniversary sets of coins including a 5 cent silver were struck with the sizes, alloys, and general reverse designs of the 1908 coins, but Queen Elizabeth's portrait and the date shown as "1908 - 1998". The early sets have an antiqued matte-proof finish that proved unpopular so later sets were issued with a mirror-proof finish.

  1. 1908-1998 ........................ MATTE-PROOF     SOLD
     
  2. 1908-1998 ....................... MIRROR-PROOF     SOLD

2011 5 CENT SILVER

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 1911 dollar, the mint produced a set of coins including a 5 cent silver were struck with the sizes, alloys, and same general obverse and reverse designs of the 1911 coins. The date is shown as 1911 - 2011, with the portrait that of George V including the godless inscriptions.

  1. 1911-2011 .............................. PROOF     SOLD


NICKELS 5 CENT

GEORGE V (continued)

1922 saw the introduction of the larger 5 cents made of nickel, struck at 21.21 mm and 4.54 grams which is exactly 100 to the pound. The obverse design by Sir E. B. Mackennal is retained, but a new reverse design by W. H. J. Blakemore was introduced.

The Royal Canadian Mint equipment was not designed to strike the relatively hard nickel so in 1922 started with a higher die pressure which resulted in relatively good strikes but rapid die deterioration, so short die life. To preserve the dies they had to lower the die pressure which resulted in weaker strikes which is the norm for most George V nickels. The most obvious place one can notice this is on the band of George V's crown which if fully struck has three jewels and eight pearls, but most examples in XF or higher grade will only show six or seven of the pearls. Examples with eight visible pearls are scarce, and eight strong pearls are rare.

The mint sourced their nickel from the International Nickel Company (INCO) which used furnace based refining which produced nickel no higher than 92% pure but even within one block of nickel delivered to the mint most of the nickel would be between 88 and 90% nickel and only a small portion would be up to 92%. Keep in mind that industrially when nickel is said to be pure nickel, that only means at least 77% nickel so when the references say these nickels are pure nickel, but are by industrial standards.

Slightly purer nickel is also slightly softer which is why these nickels have inconsistent strikes. Examples struck at 92% nickels will show good crown details with 8 clear pearls. Those in the 90 to 91% range may show eight pearls but they can be weaker. Below 90%, which is most of the nickel the mint received will not show all eight pearls and many will have only six or sometimes even four pears visible when mint condition. This makes George V nickels difficult to grade as the general rule of eight visible pears needed before a coin can be grade XF does not apply to these nickels. One must consider the amount of luster, wear to the leaves on the reverse and wear to other features when grading them. One must also consider that the price guides are for coins of average strike so when I list a coin XF-40 or higher and do not make comments on it, you should assume a six or seven bead strike. If there are less than six clear beads I will comment and price lower. If there are eight visible beads I will comment on if they are strong or weak, but as such coins are scarce they will be priced accordingly higher.

At an Edmonton coin show reception on March 2, 2014 I heard Mark Bink (an metallurgist who studies these alloys) comment that 1961 was the year the beaver got it's whiskers back. I asked him what that meant and he explained how in 1961 the mint changed from the inconsistently pure INCO nickel to Sherritt nickel chemically refined to 100% nickel so much softer and strikes better, but also more subject to bag marking. A discussion followed where I brought up the erratic striking characteristics of earlier coins, and we suddenly realized how the two were directly related.

Nickels were used extensive in parking meters and vending machines which often scratched them with what are commonly called "meter marks". Scratch free George V nickels can be difficult in grades below XF but I endeavor to offer scratch free examples and will describe scratches when present, and price accordingly.

Canada 5 cent 1931
George V 1922 to 1936, type only
(image of type only)

1922 5 CENT

There are two varieties of the 1922 5 cent in the spacing between the S of CENTS and the rim. These are confusing and often miss-identified as the real difference is an illusion caused by how the fields meet the rim. Most examples appear to have the S closer to the rim (near S) because of slightly convex fields where the metal between the S and rim rounds up into the rim. The scarcer type has flat fields making it appear there is a larger gap between the S and the rim. If you measure them there is no real difference in the spacing. While the true variety is convex and flat fields, near and far S are how most major references designate them so I use that.

Until recently ICCS did not designate these varieties on their certification so on older holders I designate it and mention the certification as grade only when the coin is the scarcer far rim type.

  1. 1922 near rim ........................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1922 near rim .......................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  3. 1922 near rim ........................... F-15   $ 1.75
  4. 1922 near rim .......................... VF-30   $ 5.00
  5. 1922 near rim ..................... ICCS AU-55   $42.50
  6. 1922 near rim ..................... ICCS MS-60   $56.00
  7. 1922 near rim ...... 8 beads ...... ICCS MS-62   $80.00
  8. 1922 near rim strong 8 beads ...... ICCS MS-64  $275.00
     
  9. 1922 far rim ............................ VG-8   $ 0.75
  10. 1922 far rim ........................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  11. 1922 far rim ................... cleaned AU-50   $40.00
  12. 1922 far rim ........................... AU-50   $55.00
  13. 1922 far rim .......... grade only, ICCS AU-55   $90.00
  14. 1922 F R weak 8 beads . grade only, ICCS AU-55  $110.00
  15. 1922 far rim 8 bead, high lustre ....... MS-62  $180.00
  16. 1922 far rim 8 bead, high lustre ....... MS-63  $300.00
  17. 1922 far rim grade only dull lustre ICCS MS-64  $400.00

1923 5 CENT

  1. 1923 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.75
  2. 1923 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.25
  3. 1923 .................................... F-12   $ 2.00
  4. 1923 .................................... F-15   $ 4.00
  5. 1923 ..................... faint scratch VF-30   $ 5.00
  6. 1923 .................. light toned ICCS AU-50   $56.00
  7. 1923 ........... minor dirt ....... ICCS AU-55  $100.00
  8. 1923 .............................. CCCS AU-55  $100.00
  9. 1923 .............................. ICCS AU-55  $100.00
  10. 1923 ........... weak 8 beads ..... ICCS AU-55  $120.00
  11. 1923 ........... weak 8 beads ..... ICCS MS-63  $400.00

1924 5 CENT

  1. 1924 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1924 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00

1925 5 CENT

1925 is the lowest mintage and scarcest date of the George V nickel series.

  1. 1925 .......................... scratches VG-8   $57.50
  2. 1925 .............................. marks VG-8   $60.00
  3. 1925 ........ problem free .............. VG-8   $67.50
  4. 1925 .................... large edge nick F-12   $52.50
  5. 1925 .......................... scratches F-12   $62.50
  6. 1925 ...................... ICCS scratch VF-20  $110.00
  7. 1925 ......... nice for the grade . ICCS VF-20  $135.00
  8. 1925 ................................... VF-30  $200.00
  9. 1925 .. 8 beads ........... PCGS 4731366 AU-58 $1800.00

1926 5 cent comes in two varieties with respect to the position of the 6. The more common near 6 variety has the tip of the 6 closer to the maple leaf which farther from the rim. The scarer far 6 has the 6 rotated slightly away from the maple leaf, causing the tip of the 6 to be slightly farther from the maple leaf while the bottom is slightly closer to the rim. One must look at both as the distance from the rim and the maple leaf as people have tried to cut down a 6 but they cannot decrease the spacing at the bottom.

1926 near 6
1926 NEAR 6

1926 far 6
1926 FAR 6

1926 near 6

  1. 1926 near 6 ................ light scratch G-6   $ 3.00
  2. 1926 near 6 ............... light scratch VG-8   $ 4.75
  3. 1926 near 6 ............................. VG-8   $ 5.00
  4. 1926 near 6 ............................ VG-10   $ 6.00
  5. 1926 near 6 ................... scratches F-12   $ 5.00
  6. 1926 near 6 ............................. F-12   $ 7.25
  7. 1926 near 6 .......... slight rough spots F-15   $ 5.00
  8. 1926 near 6 ........................ mark F-15   $ 8.00
  9. 1926 near 6 ............................. F-15   $13.50
  10. 1926 near 6 ......... 8 beads .......... XF-40   $90.00
  11. 1926 near 6 .. strong 8 beads ..... ICCS MS-60  $600.00

1926 far 6

  1. 1926 far 6 ................ light scratch VG-8  $120.00
  2. 1926 far 6 ....... nice for grade ....... VG-8  $150.00
  3. 1926 far 6 ......................... ICCS F-15  $220.00
  4. 1926 far 6 ............................. VF-20  $275.00

1927 5 CENT

  1. 1927 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1927 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  3. 1927 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  4. 1927 ...................... minor scratch F-15   $ 1.00
  5. 1927 .................................... F-15   $ 2.00
  6. 1927 .............................. ICCS AU-55   $52.50
  7. 1927 ......... strong 8 beads ..... ICCS MS-65 $1100.00

1928 5 CENT

  1. 1928 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1928 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  3. 1928 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  4. 1928 .................................... F-15   $ 2.00
  5. 1928 ..................... light scratch VF-20   $ 3.00
  6. 1928 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  7. 1928 ................................... XF-45   $22.00
  8. 1928 .............................. ICCS AU-50   $32.50
  9. 1928 .............................. ICCS AU-55   $55.00
  10. 1928 ..... clear 8 beads ......... ANACS AU-58   $75.00
  11. 1928 .... strong 8 beads .......... ICCS MS-64  $265.00
  12. 1928 .............................. ICCS MS-65  $800.00

In 1929, 1932, 1934 and 1936 references designate NEAR and FAR rim types referring to the gap between the S of CENTS and the rims as we see on the 1922 nickel, however while 1922's have a significant gap difference, there is little difference on the other dates making things very confusing. The actual difference is flat and concave fields where on flat field examples the fields meet the rim at a sharp angle, while for concave fields there is a slight rounding. As there is no difference in value or rarity for these dates, I do not sort them out.

The one question mark is on the 1932 where there may be a near and far 2 variety related to these fields, but no one seems to agree on these. The Charlton standard catalogue does not list a far 2 variety with a different value, while the Canadian Coin news trend sheet lists one with a major difference in price. Recently I have heard of a few that people felt where the far 2 sending them for certification, but could not find a certification company willing to do so and without that they are not very salable.

1929 5 CENT

  1. 1929 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1929 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  3. 1929 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  4. 1929 .................... light scratches F-15   $ 1.00
  5. 1929 .................................... F-15   $ 2.00
  6. 1929 ................... corrosion spots XF-40   $ 3.00
  7. 1929 ................................... XF-40   $12.00
  8. 1929 ................................... AU-50   $32.00
  9. 1929 .............................. ICCS AU-50   $32.00
  10. 1929 ................... NGC 1757420-032 MS-63  $200.00
  11. 1929 .... strong 8 beads .......... ICCS MS-64  $475.00

1930 5 CENT

  1. 1930 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1930 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  3. 1930 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  4. 1930 ........................ light marks F-15   $ 1.50
  5. 1930 .................................... F-15   $ 3.00
  6. 1930 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  7. 1930 ................................... VF-30   $ 8.00
  8. 1930 ................................... XF-40   $16.00
  9. 1930 ............. strong lustre ....... AU-55   $70.00
  10. 1930 ............ 8 beads ......... ICCS MS-63  $350.00

1931 5 CENT

  1. 1931 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1931 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  3. 1931 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  4. 1931 .................................... F-15   $ 3.00
  5. 1931 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  6. 1931 ................ very light scratch VF-30   $ 5.50
  7. 1931 ...... weak 8 beads .......... ICCS XF-45   $45.00
  8. 1931 ..... strong 8 beads .............. AU-50   $75.00
  9. 1931 ..... strong 8 beads ......... ICCS MS-63  $625.00

1932 5 CENT

I have been looking into the near and far S varieties of the 1932 5 cent and find no conclusive way to differentiate between.

The variety that is distinctive Near and Far 2 which is really more a high (near to the maple leaf's) and low (further from the Maple leaves) date. If you draw a line across the bottom of the maple leaves it will cut through the 2 on the near 2 (high date), but will not touch the 2 on the far 2 (low date). While the near 2 is extremely common, the far 2 is very rarely. A dealer I know checks every 1932 that he handles and in 30 year (and many thousands of them) has only found 3. The only one I have ever handled I bought from him.

  1. 1932 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1932 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  3. 1932 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  4. 1932 .................... trace scratches F-15   $ 1.00
  5. 1932 ............................... rubs F-15   $ 1.25
  6. 1932 .................................... F-15   $ 3.00
  7. 1932 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 4.00
  8. 1932 ................................... VF-30   $10.00
  9. 1932, 8 beads, st. lustre, PCGS 30462079 MS-63  $600.00
     
  10. 1932 FAR 2 (low date), problem free, ICCS F-15     SOLD

1933 5 CENT

  1. 1933 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1933 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  3. 1933 .................................... F-12   $ 2.50
  4. 1933 .................................... F-15   $ 5.00
  5. 1933 ................................... VF-20   $ 6.50
  6. 1933 ................................... XF-40   $24.00

1934 5 CENT

  1. 1934 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  2. 1934 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  3. 1934 .................................... F-15   $ 3.00
  4. 1934 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 2.50
  5. 1934 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  6. 1934 ..................... small scratch VF-30   $ 5.00
  7. 1934 ................................... XF-40   $18.00
  8. 1934 .. strong 8 beads ... PCGS 82230879 MS-64 $1500.00

1935 5 CENT

  1. 1935 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1935 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  3. 1935 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  4. 1935 .................... faint scratches F-15   $ 1.25
  5. 1935 .................................... F-15   $ 3.00
  6. 1935 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  7. 1935 ................................... VF-30   $ 8.00

1936 5 CENT

  1. 1936 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.50
  2. 1936 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  3. 1936 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  4. 1936 .................................... F-15   $ 2.00
  5. 1936 ................................... VF-20   $ 3.00
  6. 1936 ................................... AU-50   $28.00
  7. 1936 .... strong 8 beads .......... ICCS MS-64  $350.00


GEORGE VI
1937 to 1952

1937 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

With George VI coming to the throne in 1937, an new set of designs was introduced for the reverse of all Canadian coins other than silver dollars, with the beaver chosen for the 5 cent coins. There are no rare dates in this series, although there are some rare varieties for some dates such as the 1947 dot, 1951 high relief, 1953 mules, 1964 extra water line and a few others discussed below. Only examples of fairly high quality are worth the time and expense of listing them here. Average circulated examples of most dates are available in our store in a "pick bin" very inexpensively (please do not ask me to pick them out and ship them, they are available in store only).

As these were struck from the same INCO nickel as discussed above the 1922, the same problem of inconsistent hardness remained and in mint state examples one see's a wide variation in the strength of the hair lines on the King, making these somewhat difficult to grade, plus the King's eyebrow rarely strikes up, and finding mint state examples with a fill eyebrow is very difficult (nearly impossible for some dates).

1937 5 CENT

The image above shows a 1937 with the dot after the date. All 1937 5 cent coins have this dot, which the designer felt was needed to balance the design due to lean of the 7 creating a bigger gap to the right than the left of the date.

  1. 1937 .................................... F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1937 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1937 ................................... AU-50   $ 5.00
  4. 1937 ....................... soft strike MS-60   $ 8.00
  5. 1937 ................................... MS-60   $12.00
  6. 1937 ................................... MS-65  $180.00

1938 5 CENT

  1. 1938 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  2. 1938 .................................... F-15   $ 2.00
  3. 1938 ........................ light mark VF-20   $ 1.50
  4. 1938 ................................... VF-20   $ 2.00
  5. 1938 ................................... VF-30   $ 4.00
  6. 1938 ................................... XF-40   $ 6.50

1939 5 CENT

  1. 1939 .................................... F-12   $ 0.50
  2. 1939 .................................... F-15   $ 1.00
  3. 1939 ....................... light marks VF-20   $ 1.50
  4. 1939 ................................... VF-20   $ 2.00

1940 5 CENT

  1. 1940 .................................... F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1940 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1940 ................................... VF-30   $ 2.75
  4. 1940 ................................... XF-40   $ 4.00
  5. 1940 ................................... XF-45   $ 5.50
  6. 1940 .............................. ICCS MS-65  $480.00

1941 5 CENT

  1. 1941 .................................... F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1941 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1941 ................................... VF-30   $ 3.00
  4. 1941 ....................... light marks XF-40   $ 3.00
  5. 1941 ................................... XF-40   $ 5.00
  6. 1941 ................................... XF-45   $ 8.00
  7. 1941 ................................... AU-50   $12.00

1942 5 CENT - NICKEL ALLOY

  1. 1942 nickel ............................. F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1942 nickel ............................ VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1942 nickel ............................ VF-30   $ 3.00
  4. 1942 nickel ............................ XF-40   $ 4.00
  5. 1942 nickel ............................ XF-45   $ 5.50
  6. 1942 nickel ............................ AU-50   $ 8.00
  7. 1942 nickel ............................ AU-55   $14.00
  8. 1942 nickel ............................ MS-60   $20.00
  9. 1942 nickel ............................ MS-62   $32.00
  10. 1942 nickel ............................ MS-63   $48.00


TOMBAC

WW II created a nickel shortage in Canada, so starting part way through 1942 through to the end of 1943 Canadian 5 cents were struck from a brass alloy known as tombac. Realized the color was similar to one cents they were made 12 sided to reduce confusion, although this was not successful and people did not like these coins. Although not required by grading standards, most examples above XF-40 will retain at least some lustre.

1942 tombac 5 cent
(image of type only)

1942 5 CENT - TOMBAC ALLOY

The 1942 Tombac 5 cents retain the same design as the 1937 to 1942 nickel issues, with only the alloy and 12 sided shape being different.

  1. 1942 tombac ............................ VF-30   $ 1.75
  2. 1942 tombac ............................ XF-40   $ 2.00
  3. 1942 tombac ............................ XF-45   $ 2.50
  4. 1942 tombac ............................ AU-50   $ 3.00
  5. 1942 tombac ............................ AU-55   $ 4.00
  6. 1942 tombac ..................... spotty MS-60   $ 4.00
  7. 1942 tombac ............................ MS-60   $ 5.00
  8. 1942 tombac ............................ MS-62   $ 8.00
  9. 1942 tombac ..................... spotty MS-63   $12.00
  10. 1942 tombac ............................ MS-63   $16.00
  11. 1942 tombac ..................... spotty MS-64   $24.00

The twelve sided shape was not enough to stop the confusion with one cent coins, so in 1943 the reverse design was replaced by the "V" (for victory) design which was used until the war ended in 1945.

1943 5 cent
(image of type only)

1943 5 CENT - Tombac

In 1943 the traditional beaver design was replaced with a V over a torch, with a Morse code (dot and dashes) around the edge that spells out "We Win When We Work Willingly". The V had two meanings, first it stood for Victory, second it was the Roman numeral for 5 in the denomination.

  1. 1943 tombac ............................ VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1943 tombac ............................ VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1943 tombac ............................ XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1943 tombac ............................ XF-45   $ 1.50
  5. 1943 tombac ............................ AU-50   $ 2.00
  6. 1943 tombac ............................ MS-60   $ 4.00


Chrome-plated steel

In spite of the new V design and the 12 sided shape, the public still felt the brown tombac five cents were too easily confused with one cents and the coins were unpopular. As the war was still on creating a nickel shortage, 1944 and 1945 5 cents were struck with the V design but on Chrome plated steel blanks. The blanks were first nickel plated then chrome-plated resulting in a silvery-blue appearance but close enough to the look of nickel that people accepted them. The plating process was not perfect and it is not unusual to see examples with incomplete plating, and occasional examples that missed the final chrome plating resulting in a coin with nickel plating so looking like a regular nickel finish (these are known as no chrome examples). One also see occasional examples with no plating so struck directly on the steel blank.

There is a miss-understanding where people believe the chrome can be easily removed without removing the nickel plating, thus turning regular chromed coins into no chrome examples. Believing this miss-understanding ICCS will no longer designate any example as no chrome. I researched this and found several websites explaining how to remove chrome by soaking in acetone, but these websites were discussing removal of chrome paint, not the electroplated chrome on the 5 cents which can only be removed by dissolving it in acid which will destroy the entire coin.

The chrome plating on 1944 and 1945 "V" nickels scratches easily and/or wears through quickly at the high points. These coins are very common and inexpensive unless extremely high quality and I throw scratched or significantly worn examples in my till to be handed out in change. The examples offered below are scratch free unless otherwise noted.

1944 v 5 cent
(image of type only)

1944 5 CENT

  1. 1944 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1944 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1944 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1944 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.25
  5. 1944 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  6. 1944 ................................... AU-55   $ 2.25
  7. 1944 ................................... MS-60   $ 4.00
  8. 1944 ................................... MS-62   $ 5.00
  9. 1944 ........................ minor spot MS-64   $ 9.50
  10. 1944 ................................... MS-64   $12.00
  11. 1944 ................................... MS-65   $40.00
  12. 1944 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $40.00
     
  13. 1944 no chrome ... ICCS does not designate no
    chromes .......... minor rust spots ICCS MS-64     SOLD

1945 5 CENT

  1. 1945 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1945 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1945 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1945 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.25
  5. 1945 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  6. 1945 ................................... AU-58   $ 2.75
  7. 1945 ................................... MS-63   $ 5.50
     
  8. 1945 no chrome ........... light scratch VF-20   $ 1.00
  9. 1945 no chrome ................. scratch XF-40   $ 3.00

When the war ended there was no longer a nickel shortage so 1946 saw a return to both the standard "beaver" design, and the use of a nickel alloy, but retaining the 12 side form used since the 1942 tombac.

1946 5 CENT

  1. 1946 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.75
  2. 1946 slightly filled 6 ................. VF-20   $ 0.75
  3. 1946 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.50
  4. 1946 ....................... light marks XF-40   $ 1.75
  5. 1946 ................................... XF-40   $ 3.00
  6. 1946 ................................... AU-50   $ 7.25
  7. 1946 ................................... MS-63   $40.00
1946 double date 5 cent

1946 6/6 5 CENT

Some 1946 nickels have doubling of the 6 and are known as the 6/6 variety. There are two distinctly different types of doubling that occur. The first is a true re-punched 6/6 with a well formed with smooth outline of a second 6 both inside the lower right edge and along the upper back of the 6. These are somewhat scarce and what I consider a true 6/6 and what I feel the trend sheet price reflects. The second 6/6 type is due to die deterioration with slightly rough and irregular doubling inside the lower right and occasionally a little along the back of the 6. These weak 6/6 types are more common I price them lower than the strong 6/6. I have recently seen both types in certification holders with no distinction between them. I recently saw one 1946 with doubling along the bottom of the 4 and 6 due, but this was more a double date related to the 1962 double date types.

  1. 1946 strong 6/6 ......................... F-15   $12.00

1946 5 CENT - ARROWHEAD

A distinct triangular mark occurs inside the 6 of some examples, and is known as the "arrowhead" variety. These were listed by Hans Zoell as P176a.

  1. 1946 arrowhead .......................... F-12     SOLD

1947 saw two major varieties of 1947 nickels. The first are the plain 1947 actually issued in 1947. The second is the 1947 dot where one of the dies pitted resulting in a dot to the lower right of the date and while this is a die deterioration variety, it is widely collected. The third is the 1947 ML actually struck in 1948 and discussed below.

1947 5 CENT

  1. 1947 .................................... F-15   $ 0.50
  2. 1947 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.75
  3. 1947 ................................... XF-40   $ 2.00
  4. 1947 ................................... AU-50   $ 5.00
1947 dot 5 cent

1947 DOT 5 CENT

Some people believe the 1947 dot with the small dot behind the 7 was intentional to mark where the maple leaf was to be punched for the later 1947 ML variety. This is not the case as there are other dots in other positions on these, showing the dots result from die deterioration. The dot is a very small and close to round. Many people have trouble seeing it without magnification and miss-identify the larger and more ragged maple leaf on the 1947 Maple Leaf as 1947 dots (I see this several times a week).

  1. 1947 dot ................................ VG-8   $24.00
  2. 1947 dot ................................ F-12   $27.00
  3. 1947 dot ................................ F-15   $35.00
  4. 1947 dot .......................... mark VF-20   $27.00
  5. 1947 dot ............................... VF-30   $65.00

India received its independence on August 14, 1947 requiring that IND IMP (India's Emperor) be removed from all British Commonwealth coins dated 1948 or newer. A problem similar to that in 1937 when Edward the VIII abdicated, the new obverse designs for coins all over the British Commonwealth had to be prepared at the Royal Mint in England. Those for Canada were not ready at the beginning of 1948 and coins were needed, so early in 1948 coins were struck dated 1947 so that the IND IMP design could still be used but a small maple leaf was placed after the date indicating minted in 1948.

1947 MAPLE LEAF 5 CENT

  1. 1947 maple leaf ........................ VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1947 maple leaf ........................ VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1947 maple leaf ........................ XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1947 maple leaf ........................ AU-50   $ 5.00

When the new designs arrived in 1948 with IND IMP (India's Emperor) removed, the entire inscription now reads GEORGIVS VI DEI GRATIA REX (George VI By The Grace of God King) and was used until 1952.

1948 5 CENT

The newly designed 1948 5 cent dies were a little late arriving so they were struck for only a limited period time resulting in a lower than normal mintage. The new obverse design had not just a new inscription, but were engraved to produce a higher relief King's portrait with bolder hair lines. This new bold portrait was used until mid 1951 when the 1951 steel nickels were introduced and it proved difficult to strike the high relief design on steel.

  1. 1948 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.75
  2. 1948 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  3. 1948 .................................... F-15   $ 1.25
  4. 1948 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  5. 1948 ................................... VF-30   $ 3.00
  6. 1948 ................................... XF-40   $ 5.00
  7. 1948 ................................... XF-45   $ 6.75

1949 5 CENT

  1. 1949 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1949 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.00
  3. 1949 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  4. 1949 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.75
  5. 1949 ................................... AU-55   $ 5.00

1950 5 CENT

  1. 1950 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1950 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.00
  3. 1950 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  4. 1950 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.75
  5. 1950 ................................... MS-63   $16.00

Because of the economic importance the Sudbury nickel deposits the 200th anniversary of the Swedish chemist A. F. Cronstedt's discovery of nickel was commemorate by depicting a refinery building in the early year 5 cent coins. Because they were unusual people saved them so today they are very common and most are high quality. Please note this type is always has the High Relief portrait which is rare on the beaver type that replaced it later in the year.

Canada 5 cent 1951
image of 1951 5 commemorative cent, type only

1951 COMMEMORATIVE 5 CENT

  1. 1951 commemorative ..................... XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1951 commemorative ..................... XF-45   $ 0.75
  3. 1951 commemorative ..................... AU-50   $ 1.00
  4. 1951 commemorative ..................... MS-60   $ 2.50
  5. 1951 commemorative ................ ICCS MS-65  $120.00
     

The Korean war created a nickel shortage so chrome-plated steel blanks were used for the beaver design 5 cents struck later in 1951. The high-relief obverse introduced in 1948 proved difficult to strike on steel blanks so after a short time with not many struck in high-relief a new low-relief portrait was used for most 1951 beaver and all 1952 nickels. The 1951 high relief portrait beaver nickels scarce but low-relief examples very common.

5 cents continued to be struck on chrome plated steel blanks through 1952, 1953 and 1954. The chrome plating scratches easily most examples below VF-30 will be scratched. See my comments above (just above 1944) about the mistaken believe some people (including those at ICCS) have that the chrome can be easily removed, which it cannot with destroying the coin.

1951 nickel varieties

1951 BEAVER 5 CENT

As discussed above 1951 beaver type nickels comes with the very common low relief and the much scarcer high relief portraits. They are fairly easy to differentiate as the final A in GRATIA behind the King's head points between two denticles (left side of the image above) on the common low-relief but directly at a denticle on the rare high relief (right side of the image). As with all chrome plated steel nickels most examples have been scratched and I generally do not offer such examples for the common low relief. On the high relief examples I do listed scratched ones but will describe the scratches and price them accordingly.

  1. 1951 beaver high relief ................ AU-55     SOLD
     
  2. 1951 beaver low relief ................. VF-20   $ 0.50
  3. 1951 beaver low relief ................. AU-55   $ 3.00
  4. 1951 beaver low relief ................. MS-64   $20.00

1952 5 CENT

  1. 1952 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1952 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1952 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1952 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  5. 1952 ................................... AU-55   $ 3.00
  6. 1952 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $80.00


ELIZABETH II
1953 to present

Young Head Series

INCO nickel was still until about 1961 when the mint switched to Sherritt nickel refined by a leaching process that resulted in 99.9% pure nickel. The inconsistent purity, thus hardness of the INCO nickel continued with inconsistent strikes with how sharp or clear the laurels in Queen Elizabeth's hair differed from coin to coin. This makes them difficult to grade accurately. The switch to Sherritt nickel in 1961 solved this but because the nickel was softer the coins were less resisted to bag marking so nickels from 1961 to 1967 are difficult to find in MS-65 (even MS-64) and command higher prices when that nice than do 1950's nickels.

1960 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

The early 1953 dies had the shoulder fold weakly cut so the shoulder fold was usual not present, although on some well struck examples you may see a trace of it. This made the Queen's shoulder appeared bare which many people thought to be inappropriate. Known as the No Shoulder Strap (NSS) or No Shoulder Fold (NSF) variety, the easiest way to determine these is by the strong serifs at the top and bottom of the I's in II and DEI on the obverse. There is also a distinct gap (wider than on the later type) between the small maples leaf's to the upper right and left and the denticles around the rim which is why these are known as the No Shoulder fold Far Leaf variety. The entire design is slightly smaller so the date is also further from the rim.

1953 nickle far leaf
1953 far leaf, note gap between ML's and denticles

1953 NSS FAR LEAF 5 CENT

  1. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  2. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  3. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... AU-50   $ 2.00
  4. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-60   $ 3.50
  5. 1953 NSS far leaf .... small rust spot . MS-62   $ 3.00
  6. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-62   $ 5.00
  7. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-63   $ 5.50
  8. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-64   $12.00
  9. 1953 NSS far leaf ................. ICCS MS-65   $32.50
     
  10. 1953 NSS far leaf no chrome ............ VF-20     SOLD

Later in 1953 the dies were re-designed with a deeper shoulder fold which usually will be visible on the coin, although not on some weaker strikes. Known as the Shoulder Strap (SS) or Shoulder Fold (SF) variety, the easiest way to be certain of this variety is because the serifs at the top and bottom of the I's on the obverse are much smaller to the point the I's nearly appear straight. On the reverse the entire design was made slightly larger resulting in a smaller gap between the maples leaf's and the denticles (they nearly touch the denticles) and the date is slightly closer to the rim, so these are known as the Shoulder Fold Near Leaf variety.

1953 nickle near leaf
1953 near leaf ML' nearly touch denticles on the left

1953 SS NEAR LEAF 5 CENT

  1. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  3. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  4. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... AU-50   $ 2.50
  5. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... AU-55   $ 4.25
  6. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... MS-62   $ 6.50
  7. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... MS-63   $ 8.00
  8. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... MS-64   $16.00
  9. 1953 SS near leaf ................. ICCS MS-64   $16.00
  10. 1953 SS near leaf ................. ICCS MS-65   $48.00
  11. 1953 SS near leaf holder dated 1954 ICCS MS-65   $48.00
  12. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... MS-65   $48.00
  13. 1953 SS near leaf ..... CCCS hard holder MS-65   $48.00

  14. 1953 SS near leaf, no chrome . ICCS designated
    the grade but not the no chrome ... ICCS MS-62  $650.00

1953 MULE ERROR 5 CENT

When the change from the NSF to the SS variety occurred, a few dies got mixed up resulting in a small number of 1951 nickels struck and No Shoulder Strap (or NSF) Far Leaf, and some as Shoulder Strap (or SF) Near Leaf. These are known as mule errors, a term for coins struck with incorrect die pairs. The No Shoulder Strap (NSF) mules are much rarer than the Shoulder Strap (SF) mules.

  1. 1953 SS FL MULE ................ scratch VF-20  $115.00
  2. 1953 SS FL MULE ......... scratches ICCS VF-20  $120.00
  3. 1953 SS FL MULE .... problem free . ICCS VF-20  $160.00
  4. 1953 SS FL MULE (VF-30 scratch) ... ICCS VF-20  $160.00
  5. 1953 SS FL MULE ... faint scratches ICCS VF-30  $160.00
     
  6. 1953 NSF Mule ..... minor scratches ICCS VF-30     SOLD

1954 5 CENT

  1. 1954 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.75
  2. 1954 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.00
  3. 1954 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  4. 1954 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.25
  5. 1954 ................................... AU-50   $ 3.00
  6. 1954 ................................... AU-55   $ 5.00
  7. 1954 ................................... MS-63   $12.00
  8. 1954 .............................. CCCS MS-64   $20.00
  9. 1954 ................................... MS-65   $55.00
  10. 1954 .............................. ICCS PL-64   $40.00
  11. 1954 .............................. ICCS PL-65   $44.00
     
  12. 1954 no chrome ......................... XF-40     SOLD

1955 5 CENT

  1. 1955 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1955 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1955 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1955 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  5. 1955 ................................... AU-55   $ 3.00
  6. 1955 ................................... MS-60   $ 4.00
  7. 1955 .............................. ICCS PL-65   $24.00
  8. 1955 ........................ ICCS cameo PL-65   $32.00
  9. 1955 .............................. ICCS PL-66   $48.00

1956 5 CENT

  1. 1956 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1956 ................................... XF-40   $ 0.75
  3. 1956 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  4. 1956 ................................... AU-55   $ 2.25
  5. 1956 ................................... MS-62   $ 4.00
  6. 1956 ................................... MS-64   $12.00
  7. 1956 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $14.50
  8. 1956 .............................. ICCS PL-65   $18.00

1957 5 CENT

  1. 1957 ................................... XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1957 ................................... AU-50   $ 0.75
  3. 1957 ................................... MS-60   $ 1.50
  4. 1957 ................................... MS-62   $ 2.50
  5. 1957 ................................... MS-63   $ 4.00
  6. 1957 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $36.00
  7. 1957 .............................. ICCS PL-65   $13.00
  8. 1957 .............................. ICCS PL-66   $33.50
1957 bug tail 5 cent

1957 BUG TAIL 5 CENT

One 1957 die developed a die pit on the tip of the beavers tail, resulting in a raised dot, a variety known as the bug tail. This dot probably resulted from a foreign object on the die being struck into the die, as the pit is always the same size so did not form gradually.

  1. 1957 bug tail ........................... F-12   $ 3.00
  2. 1957 bug tail ........................... F-15   $ 3.50
  3. 1957 bug tail .................. scratch VF-20   $ 3.00
  4. 1957 bug tail .......................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  5. 1957 bug tail .......................... VF-30   $ 5.00
  6. 1957 bug tail .......................... XF-40   $ 5.50
  7. 1957 bug tail .......................... XF-45   $ 6.50

1958 5 CENT

Some 1958 five cents show a slight doubling of the 1 and 8 in the date, and are known as the double date, although sometimes ICCS calls them just double 18. I don't get this variety very often.

  1. 1958 ................................... XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1958 ................................... AU-50   $ 0.75
  3. 1958 ................................... MS-60   $ 1.50
  4. 1958 ................................... MS-62   $ 2.50
  5. 1958 ................................... MS-63   $ 4.00
  6. 1958 ................................... MS-64   $12.00
  7. 1958 .............................. ICCS MS-64   $12.00
  8. 1958 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 8.00
     
  9. 1958 double date ....................... XF-40     SOLD

1959 5 CENT

Similar to 1957, one of the 1959 dies develop a pit likely due to a foreign objects on the die at some point, but his time the pit is part way up the tail rather than at the tip, in a variety known as the 1959 bug. This variety is listed by Hans Zoell as B191Q.

  1. 1959 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1959 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1959 ................................... MS-63   $ 2.00
  4. 1959 ................................... MS-64   $ 8.00
     
  5. 1959 bug ....................... scratch XF-40   $ 1.00
  6. 1959 bug ............................... XF-40   $ 2.00

1960 5 CENT

Some 1960 5 cents are weakly struck beavers with much of the fur on the beaver's back so weakly struck that most of the details is missing even on otherwise high quality coins. There is a corresponding weak point on the Queen's head in the hair just above her ear. Known as the "bald beaver", Zoell listed this for 1960 as his Y192b. The amount of fur showing varies from coin to coin, but for me to list a coin as a "bald beaver" at least 80% of the fur between the head and haunch must be missing. Between 50 and 80% I may list them but noting a weak slightly bald beaver.

  1. 1960 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1960 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1960 ................................... MS-63   $ 2.00
  4. 1960 ................ very strong strike MS-63   $ 4.00
  5. 1960 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 3.00
     
  6. 1960 bald beaver ............ scratches, XF-40   $ 3.00

With the switch to purer softer Sherritt nickel in 1961, I have heard this referred to as the year the beaver got it's whiskers back due to the better strikes resulting from the slightly softer metal. The softer metal also results in more bag marks in the mint handling processes, so coins grading higher than MS-64 are very unusual in this period.

With the softer nickel the mint reduced the die pressure which extended die life, as the higher pressures were not needed. They had not used up all of the old Inco nickel so some harder flans were occasionally used and with the lower die pressure those coins received poor strikes where some of the beavers fur did not strike up. When dramatic these are know as Bald beavers. Seen mostly in 1961, I have seen some in 1962 and 1963.

1961 5 CENT

Some 1961 5 cents have some doubling of the bottom of the date and sometimes parts of the reverse inscription, usually either 61 or the first and last 1's but not as strong as on the 1962 double dates. 1961 5 cents also come in the Bald Beaver variety, and recently I had one that was both a bald beaver and a double date.

  1. 1961 thread strike though error ........ MS-60   $ 3.00
  2. 1961 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1961 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.50
  4. 1961 ............ very strong strike ... MS-63   $ 2.50
  5. 1961 ................................... MS-64   $ 8.00
  6. 1961 ................................... MS-65   $28.00
  7. 1961 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 3.00

1962 5 CENT

As described under 1960, some 1962 5 cents are known with the Bald Beaver variety.

  1. 1962 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1962 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1962 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.50
  4. 1962 ................................... MS-64   $ 8.00
  5. 1962 ................................... MS-65   $28.00
  6. 1962 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00


1962 5 cent

1962 5 CENT DOUBLE DATE

Some 1962 nickels have doubling at the bottom of the date and sometimes letters of the reverse. The doubling is slightly different from coin to coin showing it is striking effect known as machine doubling, not a result of the die cutting. The difference in the amount of double can be dramatic and the price in the CCN trend are for an average example with three digits doubled. Examples with only two digits double (usually the 1 and 2) I call weak double date and price a little lower. Examples with some doubling on all four digits I call strong double date and price them higher, with the stronger the doubling the higher the value.

  1. 1962 weak double date .................. VF-20   $ 3.00
  2. 1962 weak double date .................. MS-60   $ 5.50
  3. 1962 weak double date .................. MS-62   $ 8.00
     
  4. 1962 double date ....................... VF-20   $ 3.00
  5. 1962 double date ......... light scratch VF-30   $ 2.50
  6. 1962 double date ....................... XF-40   $ 4.00
  7. 1962 double date ....................... MS-62   $16.00
     
  8. 1962 strong double date ................ VF-20   $ 4.00
     
  9. 1962 extra strong double ..... scratches XF-40   $10.00
  10. 1962 ultra double date, best I've seen . XF-40   $40.00
  11. 1962 ultra double date ................. AU-50   $16.00

1963 5 CENT

Some 1963 nickels have doubling of the beaver's head, back, the K of the K.G. designers initials, and minor doubling on the bottom of some letters in CENTS. While not listed in any major references on Canadian coins, these are listed in Hans Zoell books as #R195j.

  1. 1963 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1963 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1963 ................................... MS-64   $10.00
  4. 1963 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $65.00
  5. 1963 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
     
  6. 1963 bald beaver (unusual for 1963) .... MS-64     SOLD
     
  7. 1963 doubled beaver ........ lt scratches F-15     SOLD

1964 5 CENT

In 1964 the government issued presentation sets, mostly for presentation to visiting dignitaries. Coin from these sets have high lustre fields with heavy to ultra cameo in both sides including on the lettering. They are different than cameo proof-likes which rarely are cameo on both sides and it is never perfectly even across both sides including the letter. ICCS calls these coins Specimen but because they do look like proofs, PCGS calls them Proof, but both mean the same thing. I have not been able to find the mintage of these sets but it was likely only a few hundred.

  1. 1964 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1964 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1964 ................................... MS-64   $10.00
  4. 1964 ... minor grease on die error ..... MS-65   $80.00
  5. 1964 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  6. 1964 ........................ cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00
  7. 1964 .................. heavy cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 5.00
  8. 1964 .................. ICCS HEAVY CAMEO SP-64   $80.00
1964 extra water line 5 cent

1964 Extra Water Line

One 1964 reverse die developed a heavy die crack above the water lines to the left of the beaver, resulting in what looks like an extra waterline and is known as the extra waterline (XWL) variety and is listed in standard references and widely collected.

  1. 1964 extra water line ................... F-12   $20.00
  2. 1964 extra water line ................... F-15   $22.00
  3. 1964 extra water line .......... scratch XF-45   $16.00
  4. 1964 extra water line .................. XF-45   $27.00
  5. 1964 extra water line ............ baggy AU-50   $28.00
  6. 1964 extra water line .................. MS-60   $36.00
  7. 1964 extra water line ............. ICCS MS-63  $100.00

Starting in 1965, the Queen's portrait was updated to a more mature head, wearing a tiara.

1966 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1965 5 CENT

The 1965 nickel is common as a date worth very little unless high quality or the rare large bead variety. It is not difficult to differentiate between the common small and rare large bead once you know how, and there are two diagnostics to look for. Most reference say to imagine a line drawn between the II to the upper left of the Queen's head and it will point between two beads on the common small bead but directly at a bead on the rare large bead. It find that way difficult to tell, what I find clearer is the A of REGINA it will point between two beads on the common type, and directly at a bead on the rare type. Until recently it was thought all large bead examples have a detached jewel at the back of the Queen's head, but recently some examples with an attached jewel have turned up.

Many people bringing in examples they claim are large bead but which are not. It not difficult to tell if looking closely, but it seems most people have trouble with it. Keep in mind that the population of large beads is probably less than 1 in 100,000. If you had 100,000 examples available it is only a 50-50 chance you will find one and if it takes you 10 seconds to closely examine each one, it will take you about 280 hours to check them (less than 1/2 minimum wage even if you find one).

  1. 1965 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  2. 1965 ................................... MS-64   $10.00
  3. 1965 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
     
  4. 1965 large bead attached jewel ......... AU-50     SOLD
     

1966 5 CENT

The purer and thus softer Sherritt nickel was adopted part way through 1961, the last old stock Inco nickel probably used up early 1963. 5 cents from 1964 to 1981 are all struck on the softer Sherritt nickel and tend to have more bag marks than earlier dates and high really high grade examples are difficult to find but reasons I do not understand this is especially true for 1966 where finding examples that grade MS-65 is nearly impossible. On the other hand, in 1966 there was a rumor that 1966 5 cents were going to be rare so people hoarded them in large numbers and today original rolls are very common.

  1. 1966 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1966 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1966 ................................... MS-64   $16.00
  4. 1966 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

In 1967, to celebrate Canada's 100th anniversary as a country, all of the standard circulating coins were issued depicting various animals common to Canada, with a rabbit on these 5 cent coins. Please note that the examples of this type we offer here are exceptional examples, either Proof-likes, Specimens or high end MS examples, often with a cameo portrait and/or rabbit. Normal examples, even in MS-60 to 63, or examples from proof-like or specimens sets with any problems, are very common and of no significant value beyond what you can spend them for, so we do not offer them here. For most coins if listed as cameo it is only the portrait side where the cameo effect is important. On these 1967 coins many people like the cameo effect on the animals, so for these we will note if the cameo is on the portrait, on the rabbit, or both (you seldom get it on both, but they do show up sometimes in the specimen sets).

1967 5 CENT

  1. 1967 rabbit ............................ MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1967 rabbit ............................ MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1967 rabbit ............................ MS-64   $ 8.00
  4. 1967 rabbit ....................... PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  5. 1967 rabbit ................. cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00
  6. 1967 rabbit ......................... SPECIMEN   $ 0.75
  7. 1967 rabbit ................... cameo SPECIMEN   $ 2.00

The beaver design resumes in 1968. Most 5 cent dates from 1968 and newer have no collectable value unless in very high quality (generally MS-63 or higher) or if from proof-likes, specimens or Proofs but even then the values are minimal. If I do not have a particular date listed below do not assume it is rare. It is more likely so common that I do not have one nice enough to be of enough value to justify listing.

Please note that up to 2011 when I describe a coin to be Proof-like (PL) I mean a coin from a standard mint set. Intentionally struck to a higher quality than circulation strikes, they are usually easier to find that mince Mint state (MS) coins from a bank rolls, thus less expensive. PL coins tend to have better strikes and higher luster than IS coins, so are fairly easy to differentiate. ICCS and some references use the term NON-CIRCULATING NUMISMATIC MINT STATE for these coins; which I find causes confusion in beginning collectors. In 2012 the mint stopped making intentionally nicer coins for the standard sets which then only contain standard MS (mint state) coins. Specimen and proof examples were still make with distinct differences.

1968 5 CENT

  1. 1968 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1968 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1968 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1968 ................................... MS-65   $24.00
  5. 1968 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50

1969 5 CENT

  1. 1969 .............................. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

1970 5 CENT

  1. 1970 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  2. 1970 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50

Beginning in 1971, the mint begins striking three different striking qualities of coins, with a fourth added in 1981 :

Mint state (abbreviated MS) which are coins struck for issue through the banks and have average lustre and surface qualities. In most cases MS coins have little value unless in the highest range of the MS coins, and those are seldom seen. We don't list most dates in MS because they are not of high enough value to justify the time and trouble to list and/or ship them.

Proof-like (abbreviated PL) are standard mint set coins, usually from the pliofilm packaged sets, red double penny sets, and later the blue book set, but in later dates there were a variety of other types of sets they can come from. PL coins have a much higher lustre than MS coins, mostly because they are struck from dies in their newest die state. They also have very minimal marks (the average PL is a PL-64) as they did not go through as many of the mint handling processes as MS coins do, but they are not perfect coins and one should not expect them to be absolutely mark free.

Specimen (abbreviated SP or SPEC) which were in the black leather double dollar sets from 1971 to 1980, and for later dates in various types sets. Like PL coins they are struck from dies in their freshest die state but differ in being double struck to give them a higher lustre and sharper images, and they do not go through any mint handling processes before going into the sets so are nearly mark free. The rims tend and edges tend to be a little sharper although this is not obvious on a casual inspection. When we list a coin as being a specimen, it is because we personally took it from a specimen set before listing it here.

Proof (abbreviated PR) coins are very nice coins found mostly issued in the double dollar black leather boxed proof sets starting in 1981, although some specialty coins did come other ways. The coins are clearly differing from the other striking qualities by being double struck from specially prepared dies so they have mirror fields and frosted images (and ultra cameo effect) and are specially handled so they go into the sets in near perfect condition as possible.

1971 5 CENT

  1. 1971 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1971 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1971 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1971 ................................... MS-65   $24.00
  5. 1971 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  6. 1971 .................. ICCS heavy cameo PL-65   $ 8.00

1972 5 CENT

  1. 1972 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1972 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1972 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1972 .................. heavy cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 8.00

1973 5 CENT

  1. 1973 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  2. 1973 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1973 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1974 5 CENT

  1. 1974 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1974 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1974 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1974 ................................... MS-65   $24.00
  5. 1974 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  6. 1974 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

1975 5 CENT

  1. 1975 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1975 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1975 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1975 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  5. 1975 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

1976 5 CENT

  1. 1976 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50
  2. 1976 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.00

1977 5 CENT

1977 comes in two varieties where one has the 7's slightly lower than the other, resulting in a low high 7's varieties. Circulation (MS) strikes are found in both varieties with some confusion in the references as to which is scarcer where the CCN trend sheet lists the high 7 as scarcer but the Charlton Standard Catalogue lists the low 7 as scarcer. All proof-like and specimen examples are the high 7. I am not certain which is correct but will look into it.

There are two things that are different about them. On the low 7 the gap between the date and CANADA is slightly wider, plus the top right tip of the 7 ends slightly to the right up the right side of the upright on the D. On the high 7 that gap is narrower, and that tip of the 7 ends more directly below that edge of the upright on the D. Even with that this can be a difficult variety to differentiate.

  1. 1977 low 7 ............................. MS-63     SOLD
     
  2. 1977 high 7 ............................ MS-65   $80.00
  3. 1977 high 7 ....................... PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  4. 1977 high 7 ......................... SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

1978 5 CENT

  1. 1978 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1978 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

1979 5 CENT

  1. 1979 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1979 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1979 ................................... MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1979 ................................... MS-65   $20.00
  5. 1979 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  6. 1979 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

1980 5 CENT

  1. 1980 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.50

1981 saw the introduction of proof sets to replace the double dollar specimen sets. The proof coins have frosted images against mirror fields and while specimen strikes continued to be struck, they were in other types of sets. Whether proof or specimen coins are easier to get as single coins, depends mostly in the value of the intact sets they come from. Generally after 2012 most proof sets are worth more intact than broken up so those coins are harder to get in proof.

1981 5 CENT

  1. 1981 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  2. 1981 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

In 1982 the alloy for nickels was changed from pure nickel to a cupro-nickel alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The size and weight remained the same at 21.21 mm diameter, 1.75 mm thick, and 4.54 grams and while they look exactly like the earlier dates they will not attract to a magnet. A peculiarity of 1982 nickels not seen on most other dates is many examples in proof-like and proof develop toning. Most go a light golden color but some go more vivid colors. I am noticing that as the years go buy more and more of them tone in these sets and white examples are becoming more difficult to find. I do not know why this happens to this dates but not other cupro-nickel examples after 1982.

1982 5 CENT

  1. 1982 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  2. 1982 ..................... rainbow toned PROOF   $ 2.00

1983 5 CENT

  1. 1983 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
  2. 1983 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  3. 1983 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1984 5 CENT

  1. 1984 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
  2. 1984 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  3. 1984 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1985 5 CENT

  1. 1985 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
  2. 1985 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  3. 1985 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1986 5 CENT

  1. 1986 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
  2. 1986 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  3. 1986 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1987 5 CENT

  1. 1987 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1987 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1987 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1988 5 CENT

  1. 1988 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1988 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1988 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1989 5 CENT

  1. 1989 ................................... MS-62   $ 1.00
  2. 1989 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.25
  3. 1989 ................................... MS-64   $12.00
  4. 1989 ................................... MS-65   $36.00
  5. 1989 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
  6. 1989 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
  7. 1989 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00


ELIZABETH II, Crowned Head

1990 5 CENT

One or more of the 1990 5 cent dies was missing some fur detail on the beavers belly resulting in what is known as the bare belly beaver variety. This probably results from over polishing of the dies.

  1. 1990 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  2. 1990 ....................... slight tone MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1990 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
  4. 1990 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
  5. 1990 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00
     
  6. 1990 bare belly beaver ................. XF-40     SOLD

1991 5 CENT

  1. 1991 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.50
  2. 1991 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 4.50
  3. 1991 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1992 5 CENT

1992 was Canada's 125th anniversary of confederation, and all 5 cents of this year have the date shown as the double date 1867-1992.

  1. 1992 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1992 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 1992 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  4. 1992 ................................... PROOF   $ 3.00

1993 5 CENT

  1. 1993 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1993 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1993 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1994 5 CENT

  1. 1994 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 1994 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  3. 1994 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  4. 1994 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  5. 1994 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

1995 5 CENT

  1. 1995 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  2. 1995 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.00

From 1996 to 2011, all of the Proof strikes of five cent coins are of sterling (92.5%) silver at 5.5 grams, while proof-like, specimen and circulation strike coins are still of cupro-nickel alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The holders for proof sets are not sealed air tight, so air can get in and often causes the silver coins to develop a light golden brown toning, especially around the edges. Tone free (pure white) examples can be difficult to find for some dates. One should expect at least a little toning around the edges on these coins, which can be fairly attractive, but if you prefer white tone free examples please specify such on your order and I can usually accommodate such requests. Examples with heavier toning will be noted in the descriptions.

1996 5 CENT

There are near and far 6 varieties of 1996 nickels, defined by the distance between the tail of the 6 and the D of CANADA. All examples in mint sets are near 6 but both occur on circulation strikes. Starting in 1996 specimen strike have a slightly matte background with mirror finish designs so a reverse cameo effect. For a few years starting in 1996 proof-likes also have this effect but not as strongly as on the specimen strikes.

  1. 1996 near 6 ............................ PROOF   $ 7.00

1997 5 CENT

In 1997 one still sees the matte background with polished images on the proof-like and specimen strikes, but not as strongly as on 1996, and oddly the effect is sometimes stronger on the proof-likes than the specimens. Although the CCN trend sheet list different prices for Ottawa and Winnipeg mint nickels from sets, it is impossible to distinguish them once removed from the sets so as single coins there should not be a difference in price.

  1. 1997 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  2. 1997 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 7.00
  3. 1997 ................. edge tone, silver PROOF   $ 7.00

1998 5 CENT

In 1998, the Mint put a "W" mint mark below the Queen's head on coins minted at Winnipeg, although those were all in proof-like sets. Later in the years the minting of these sets was moved back to Ottawa where no mint mark was used. Thus proof-like 5 cents are found both with and without the "W" mint mark. All circulation (MS), specimen and proof coins were without mint mark. The finish on 1998 proof-like coins returns to high luster finish, while specimen coins retain the slightly matte finish fields with high lustre designs that first appeared in 1996.

  1. 1998 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  2. 1998 ................ light tone, silver PROOF   $ 7.00
     
  3. 1998 W ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00

1999 5 CENT

  1. 1999 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1999 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1999 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 7.00
  4. 1999 ........... light edge tone, silver PROOF   $ 7.00

1999 P TEST 5 CENT

In 1999, as a cost saving measure, the Canadian Mint made plans to strike 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cent coins on nickel plated steel blanks which were first nickel plated, then copper plated and then for all denominations other than the 1 cent, nickel plated again. A P was placed below the Queen's portrait to indicate a plated steel blank. First struck only as test tokens for vending machine companies for calibrate purposes, those companies were supposed to return them to the mint. Some ended up on the market at very high prices so the mint got in on the action selling 20,000 sets to collectors at much lower prices.

Packaged like Proof-like sets their exact status is unclear and I prefer to call them Proof-likes, but others including ICCS call them Mint State. A mintage of only 20,000 means they are nearly as scarce as 1948 dollars. The vinyl packaging leaves a light film on them that can be removed with rubbing alcohol.

  1. 1999 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $12.00

2000 5 CENT

Most 2000 5 cents, including those in Proof-like and Specimen sets, were on cupro-nickel blanks with nothing below the bust. Some examples in Proof-like quality were struck at Winnipeg with the W mint mark but those are also on cupro-nickel blanks.

A relatively small mintage (just under 5 million) were struck on plated steel with the P but only for circulation, making them the first circulating Canadian coins on these blanks. It is not clear to me if these are a later year change, or an experiment that may have occurred any time during the year.

  1. 2000 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 2000 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 2000 ........... light edge tone, silver PROOF   $ 7.00
     
  4. 2000 W ............................ PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
     
  5. 2000 P ................................. MS-62     SOLD

Two special commemorative 5 cents were issued in 2000. The first commemorates the Les Voltigeurs regiment headquartered in Quebec which was formed in 1862 and served as an armored regiment during world war II. The second commemorates the Royal Military College of Canada established at Kingston Ontario in 1874. Both are struck on 21.3 mm diameter, 1.85 mm thickness, 5.3 gram sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) flans.

2000 Les Voltigeurs 5 CENT

A commemorative 5 cent was struck in 2000 to commemorate Les Voltigeurs regiment headquartered in Quebec, formed in 1862 and served as an armored regiment in world war II. All examples are struck in Proof at 21.3 mm diameter, 1.85 mm thickness and 5.3 gram of sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper). The price listed is for an example in it's capsule but not the original box, which allows for reasonable priced shipping. If you want it in the original box I may be able to provide but because it is thick and has to go parcel post it will add about $8.00 to the shipping charge.

  1. 2000 Voltigeur com no case, reverse tone PROOF     SOLD

2001 5 CENT

Circulation strike 2001 5 cents are found on cupro-nickel blanks with nothing below the bust and are the last circulation strike coins issued on none-plated blanks. 5 cents on plated steel blanks with the P for plated were issued but only in proof-like and specimen strikes. All proof strikes are solid silver without the P.

  1. 2001 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 5.50
  2. 2001 attractive heavier edge tone silver PROOF   $ 7.00
     
  3. 2001 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

2001 ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 5 CENT

A commemorative 5 cent was struck in 2001 to commemorate the Royal Military College of Canada established at Kingston Ontario in 1874. The specifications and shipping rules are the same as for the 2000 Les Voltigeurs 5 cent listed above.

  1. 2001 Military college commemorative .... PROOF     SOLD

2002 5 CENT

2002 was the 50th anniversary of the Queen's accession which is commemorated on most Canadian coins of that year with the double date as 1952 2002 to the lower left of the Queen's head. The area where the date would be on other dates is blank and I common get phone calls about these coins from people saying they have nickel with no date on it. All except the silver Proof's are on plated blanks with the P.

  1. 2002 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 7.00
     
  2. 2002 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 2002 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

2002 BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE

A commemorative 5 cent was struck in 2002 to commemorate the 85th anniversary of the battle of Vimy Ridge which occurred from April 9th to 12th, 1927. The reverse depicts a lady in morning in front of the Vimy Monument. The specifications and shipping rules are the same as for the 2000 Les Voltigeurs 5 cent listed above.

  1. 2002 Vimy Ridge ........................ PROOF     SOLD

2003 was an interesting year for Canadian coins, with a number of varieties including the introduction of a new effigy of the Queen without a crown.

2003 5 CENT Old Effigy

Coins struck earlier in 2003 have the crowned effigy of the Queen first introduced in 1990 and are found both with a P below the Queen's bust on plated steel or without the P on solid silver blanks from proof sets. Most proof-like and all specimen and normal proof sets in 2003 are of this bust type.

  1. 2003 P old effigy ................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
     
  2. 2003 old effigy ................. silver PROOF     SOLD

2003 5 CENT New Effigy

Later in 2003 the Queen's bust was redesigned without a crown. Timed to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her coronation, the new effigy Coronation Portrait was introduced showing her without a crown but as it became the standard portrait for later years it is commonly known as the New Effigy. All New Effigy examples are on plated steel with the P. Those with just the P are only found from bank rolls for circulation with some Proof-like sets struck at Winnipeg found with WP to designate the Winnipeg mint, the only time the W and P appear on coins at the same time.

I just noticed the 2021 Charlton Standard catalogue lists the New Effigy as existing with only the P in Proof-like and specimen but I believe that to be an error as he does not list such for any other denomination.

  1. 2003 P new effigy ...................... MS-65     SOLD
     
  2. 2003 WP new effigy ................ PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

2003 5 CENT Youthful effigy

To commemorate the Queen's 50th anniversary of her coronation, a special issue of coins was struck depicting a youthful portrait flanked by 1953 and 2003. These come from a special edition proof set, only issued in sterling silver.

  1. 1953-2003 youthful effigy ....... silver PROOF   $15.00
     

2004 and all later dates use the new effigy portrait and are struck on plated steel blanks other than the solid silver proof examples. As in previous few years, Proof-like coins have an over all even lustre while specimen examples have high lustre designs with matte backgrounds.

2004 5 CENT

  1. 2004 ............ light edge tone silver PROOF     SOLD
     
  2. 2004 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

2004 D DAY 5 CENT

2004 was the 60th anniversary of the D day landing so 5 cent coins with the reverse based on the 1943 to 1945 V nickels were issued but with the dates 1944 - 2004 flanking the V, and random dot's and dashes where the Morse code around the edge should have been. These only come in proof quality, on 12 sided 21.3 mm, 5.3 gram sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) flans.

  1. 2004 60th anniversary of D-Day .. silver PROOF     SOLD
     
  2. 2004 60th an D-Day set 5 C and medallion PROOF     SOLD

2005 5 CENT

  1. 2005 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 8.00
     
  2. 2005 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 2005 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25

2005 V-E DAY 5 CENT

60th anniversary of Victory in European (V-E) Day commemorative 5 cents were issued with a similar reverse to the 1943 to 1945 V 5 cents but dated as 1945 - 2005 flanking the V and lack the Morse code seen on the earlier types. Circulation (MS) and Proof-likes are on round plated blanks with an obverse of the Queen with the P below. Silver proof examples are on 12 sided 21.3 mm blanks containing 5.3 grams of sterling silver with the portrait of George VI, with random dots and dashes around the reverse which does not say anything in Morse code. A few silver proofs found only in the 2005 mint report covers have selective gold plating on the V and torch, with a laminated plastic bubble over it.

  1. 2005 P, V-E day Elizabeth II obverse ... MS-62   $ 0.50
  2. 2005 P, V-E day Elizabeth II obverse ... MS-63   $ 0.75
     
  3. 2005 P, V-E day George V obverse, from mint
    report with gold portrait ....... silver PROOF   $60.00

2006 5 CENT

2006 5 cents come in three varieties. Those with nothing below the Queen's head, struck in both Cupro Nickel for circulation, and sterling silver in the proof sets. Those with a P below her head, struck on plated steel in mint state, proof-like and specimen earlier in the years. Those with the mint logo below her head, struck on plated steel in mint state and proof-like, struck later in the year. The circulation strikes without a P or Logo are generally the more difficult to find.

  1. 2006 ................................... MS-63   $ 0.75
  2. 2006 ................................... MS-64   $ 5.00
     
  3. 2006 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
     
  4. 2006 LOGO ......................... PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

Starting in 2007, all Canada 5 cents including the silver proof coins, have the stylized maple leaf mint logo below the Queen's bust so I will not bother to mention it in the listings below here.

2007 5 CENT

  1. 2007 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  2. 2007 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 9.00

2008 5 CENT

  1. 2008 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
  2. 2008 ............................ silver PROOF   $10.00

2009 5 CENT

  1. 2009 .. very light gold edge tone silver PROOF   $10.00

2010 5 CENT

  1. 2010 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  2. 2010 ............................ silver PROOF   $10.00

In 2011 the mint stopped making intentionally superior quality coins for Proof-like (standard) mint sets, rather using normal MS coins that had not gone through all of the mint handling processes rolled coins go through. With no way to differentiate between MS-63 or better coins from a set vs bank rolls, they should be priced the same with the prices reflecting how earlier dates from sets are priced. When available I will price the standard 5 cent types here at MS-63 @ $0.50. MS-64 @ $1.00. MS-65 @ $ 1.50. Specimen sets are still produced with frosted backgrounds and mirror designs and should be priced slightly higher than the PL listings.

2011 5 CENT

  1. 2011 ................................... MS-64   $ 1.00
  2. 2011 ............................ silver PROOF   $10.00

From 1996 until 2011 all silver colored coins in normal mint sets were struck of silver but starting in 2012 they mint made them in both silver and nickel plated steel, with the only way to differentiate them is with a magnet which will not attract to the silver examples.

2012 5 CENT

  1. 2012 ................................... MS-64   $ 1.00
  2. 2012 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 2012 magnetic ................... nickel PROOF   $ 6.50

2013 5 CENT

  1. 2013 non-magnetic ............... silver PROOF   $12.75

2014 5 CENT

  1. 2014 non-magnetic ............... silver PROOF   $12.75

2015 5 CENT

  1. 2015 ................................... MS-64   $ 1.00

2016 5 CENT

  1. 2016 ................................... MS-63     SOLD

2017 5 CENT

Canada's 150'th anniversary as a country was celebrated in 2017, and both regular coins and special anniversary coins were issued that year. On the 5 cent the regular traditional beaver type is the most common, issued in over 100 million in both bank rolls and some mint sets. The commemorative issue was called the Livings Traditions beaver, depicting a stylized beaver with it's legs out, with about 20 million issued in both bank rolls and mint sets.

  1. 2017 regular beaver ................. SPECIMEN     SOLD
  2. 2017 living traditions ................. MS-64     SOLD

2018 5 CENT

  1. 2018 ................................... MS-65     SOLD

2018 5 CENT

  1. 2019 magnetic ................... nickel PROOF   $ 6.50

Please note that up to 2010 I describe coins as Proof-like (PL) if they come from a mint set. PL coins are easily differentiated by their superior strike and luster, with only very minor bag marks and while nicer than MS coins from bank rolls they are easier to find in high grades and usually worth less. ICCS and some references refer to these as NON-CIRCULATING NUMISMATIC MINT STATE which I find confusing which is why I to call them Proof-like. In 2011 the mint started putting standard Mint State coins in the normal mint sets, although these bypassed some of the mint handling procedures so these coins will usually be MS-64 and MS-65. This makes those grades more common than for earlier dates. Specimen and proof sets still use specially struck coins with distinctive finishes.

Prices are in Canadian Dollars

All orders shipped to addresses in Canada must add GST (or HST).

SHORTCUTS TO SECTIONS

Victoria Silver, 1858-1901
Edward VII Silver, 1902-1910
George V Silver, 1911-1921
George V Nickel, 1922-1936
George VI, 1937-1952
Elizabeth, 1953-1989
Elizabeth, 1990-2012




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